Workshops

Attendees can register for two workshops.

 

 


Copyright and Fair Use 

​Richard Conran, MD, JD, PhD, Chairman and Professor of EVMS Pathology & Anatomy

Inherent in the academic setting is use of information from different sources. To promote scholarship, the U.S. Constitution provides copyright protection for creative works. Use of material without permission may lead to copyright infringement. This session will address issues unique to U.S. copyright law.

  • Participants will differentiate between copyright protection, infringement, fair use doctrine and licensing.
  • Participants will evaluate examples and decide whether a copyright violation has occurred. 

 


Bridging the Curricular Divide: How Team-Based Learning Engages Students and Achieves Learning Outcomes Across Degree Programs 

Jennifer Styron, PhD, EVMS Director of SCSIL Teaching & Assessment; Robin Risling-de Jong, PA-C, MHS; Ronald Styron, EdD; Amanda Creel, MSN, BS, RN, NRP

This presentation introduces participants to Team-Based Learning, an evidenced-based active learning instructional strategy. The presenters share their experiences of providing a common instructional strategy across all learning experiences and discuss implications on students’ critical thinking, collaboration, engagement and persistence.


Part 1: Introduction to Team-Based Learning (TBL)
  • ​Participants will learn the three-step cycle: preparation, in-class readiness assurance testing and application-focused exercises.

Part 2: Integrating TBL

  • Participants will discuss how this instructional approach can be utilized in clinical, didactic, service-learning and simulation settings​.

 


Breaking the Mold: Transformation in Medical Education as a Call for Scholarly Action

Luann Wilkerson, EdD, Professor of Medical Education and Associate Dean for Evaluation and Faculty Development at Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin

In this workshop, we will begin by discussing what is known about how people learn and how our current teaching practices maximize or miss opportunities to maximize learning. Using a case study of the new medical school at the University of Texas at Austin, we will consider some of the ways in which curricular design and teaching strategies are transforming traditional medical education classroom and clinical experiences and assess how prepared we may be to recruit our colleagues to help us break the mold of more traditional medical education practices.

  • Participants will explore educational transformation as a stimulus for scholarly teaching.
  • Participants will be able to plan teaching strategies that maximize learning outcomes.
  • Participants will assess their capacity as transformative educational leaders.​

 


The Key to Innovation

Carrie Elzie, PhD, EVMS Program Director of Contemporary Human Anatomy and Associate Professor of Pathology & Anatomy; Craig Goodmurphy, PhD, EVMS Professor of Pathology and Anatomy

This workshop is based on the book "The Innovation Code: The Creative Power of Constructive Conflict" by Jeff Degraff, who posits that innovation happens when we bring people with contrasting perspectives and complementary areas of expertise together in one room.

  • Participants will determine their own innovator archetypes.
  • Participants will learn a simple framework to explain the ways different kinds of thinkers can create constructive conflict in order to maximize innovation.
  • Participants will learn steps to building, managing and embracing the dynamic discord of a team using tools, methods, examples, exercises and assessments.​

 


​Growing Our Skills as Teachers Through Peer Mentoring

Luann Wilkerson, EdD, Professor of Medical Education and Associate Dean for Evaluation and Faculty Development at Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin​

​Peer observation and mentoring can be a powerful resource for professional development. In this workshop, we will work together to identify the challenges and opportunities of an effective peer mentoring system that could enhance our ongoing improvement as teachers. We will consider what is needed to set up a peer mentoring relationship, conduct observations in classroom and clinical settings and debrief to reinforce what is working and explore what might lead to improvements in learning for our students or residents. The workshop will include an opportunity to observe a teacher via video and compare our insights into the issues that might be discussed as a peer mentor with that teacher.

  • Participants will describe the characteristics of an effective peer mentoring system focused on teaching improvement.
  • Participants will develop a protocol for setting up, conducting, and debriefing a peer observation of teaching.
  • Participants will demonstrate skill in identifying issues for discussion when observing a teaching event.​

 


​Making the Transition from Curricular Evaluations to Medical Education Research

Carrie Elzie, PhD, EVMS Program Director of Contemporary Human Anatomy and Associate Professor of Pathology & Anatomy; Laurie Wellman, PhD, EVMS Biorepository Director and Associate Professor of Pathology & Anatomy; Marta Ambrozewicz, PhD, EVMS Assistant Professor of Pathology & Anatomy; Cynthia Cadieux, PhD, RDN, FAND, EVMS Program Director and Associate Professor of Medical and Health Professions Education and Assistant Dean of Institutional Effectiveness & Program Review​
  • Participants will delineate the difference between local quality improvement of curricula and generalizable educational research.
  • ​Participants will receive guidance on how to rethink curriculum assessment tools in order to generate research questions and design impactful medical education research.

 


Improving Student Satisfaction by Increasing Engagement in the Classroom

Brielle Ashley, MA Ed, Media Manager for EVMS Distance Education; David Bilberry, MEd, Educational Specialist and Instructional Designer for EVMS Distance Education; Kyle Zeltmann, Media Specialist for EVMS Distance Education; Cynthia P. Cadieux, PhD, RDN, FAND, EVMS Program Director and Associate Professor of Medical and Health Professions Education and Assistant Dean of Institutional Effectiveness & Program Review​

Student satisfaction is highly correlated to social engagement, social interaction and collaborative learning. Faculty can use simple educational technologies to build social engagement and interaction in the classroom regardless of whether the course is face-to-face, hybrid or online.

  • ​​Participants will learn to use simple education technologies to foster student and faculty engagement to enhance student satisfaction. Tools featured include VoiceThread and FlipGrid.​