Woong-Ki Kim, PhD

<p>PhD, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey</p>

Professor

Microbiology and Molecular Cell Biology


Lewis Hall

757.446.5639

kimw@evms.edu


Courses Taught



Biomedical Sciences Program Track: Molecular Integrative Biosciences (MIB)

Immunology

Graduate Education

PhD, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey

Postdoctoral Education

Postdoctoral Training, Harvard Medical School

Research Interests

The focus of my research is on AIDS pathogenesis, neuroAIDS and the study of monocyte maturation, infection and traffic. The goals of these studies are to define the role of macrophages in the central nervous system, and monocytes and CD8+ T lymphocytes outside the brain, contributing to pathogenesis of disease. Much of this work is done in non-human primate models.
We have described target cells infected in the CNS, their turnover and replacement by cells from the blood and bone marrow, and emerging subpopulations of monocytes that expand with disease. While investigating a pathogenic role of activated/infected monocytes in the induction of brain infection and inflammation, we are currently working on immunologic agents that selectively target SIV and HIV infected, activated monocyte/macrophages. We use the CD8 lymphocyte depletion and rapid AIDS model to study the consequences of monocyte/macrophage activation and traffic, the role of viral sequences within SIV that may drive CNS disease.

Presentations and Scholarships

Selected Publications

Courses Taught



Biomedical Sciences Program Track: Molecular Integrative Biosciences (MIB)

Immunology

Graduate Education

PhD, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey

Postdoctoral Education

Postdoctoral Training, Harvard Medical School

Research Interests

The focus of my research is on AIDS pathogenesis, neuroAIDS and the study of monocyte maturation, infection and traffic. The goals of these studies are to define the role of macrophages in the central nervous system, and monocytes and CD8+ T lymphocytes outside the brain, contributing to pathogenesis of disease. Much of this work is done in non-human primate models.
We have described target cells infected in the CNS, their turnover and replacement by cells from the blood and bone marrow, and emerging subpopulations of monocytes that expand with disease. While investigating a pathogenic role of activated/infected monocytes in the induction of brain infection and inflammation, we are currently working on immunologic agents that selectively target SIV and HIV infected, activated monocyte/macrophages. We use the CD8 lymphocyte depletion and rapid AIDS model to study the consequences of monocyte/macrophage activation and traffic, the role of viral sequences within SIV that may drive CNS disease.

Presentations and Scholarships

Selected Publications

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