Intellectual Climate

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Principle: Students' current level of development interacts with the social, emotional, and intellectual climate of the course to impact learning.

    Students are not only intellectual but also social and emotional beings, and they are still developing the full range of intellectual, social, and emotional skills. While we cannot control the developmental process, we can shape the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical aspects of classroom climate in developmentally appropriate ways. In fact, many studies have shown that the climate we create has implications for our students. A negative climate may impede learning and performance, but a positive climate can energize students’ learning (Ambrose, Bridges, Lovett, DiPietro, & Norman, 2010, p.6).

 

For more information visit the Carnegie Mellon Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Education Innovation

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., Lovett, M. C., DiPietro, M., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How Learning Works: 7 Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching. San Francisco, CA: Josey-Bass.