EVMS Clinical Psychology Internship - Overview and Philosophy

Philosophy 

The EVMS Clinical Psychology Internship Program adheres to a practitioner-scholar model to create a psychology workforce prepared to function effectively in inter-professional relationships across healthcare settings.  The competencies emphasized reflect the real-life skills a psychologist will require for ethical and effective professional practice.  The educational activities of the internship program also yield explicit expectations that are aligned with the general competencies a psychologist needs as well as specialty specific competencies.  The internship program ensures that incremental learning occurs (i.e. psychology interns are reaching benchmarks and, ultimately, competence) as the results of real world experiences and fosters intern self-assessment.

The majority of clinical training occurs within inpatient settings, but opportunities are also available in a variety of outpatient settings within an academic medical center.  Participation in clinical research is also encouraged. The internship is designed to create the competencies necessary for internship completers to provide evidence-based assessments, interventions and consultations within integrated healthcare models.  Supervised clinical experiences are provided that allow for the consolidation of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for entry-level practice of professional clinical psychology that adheres to the professional, legal, and ethical standards of the field.  All aspects of training are designed to promote awareness, understanding and sensitivity to issues of multicultural diversity.

 

Program Overview

The EVMS Clinical Psychology Internship Program’s main goal is to create a psychology workforce prepared to for a rapidly changing healthcare system that emphasizes inter-professional interactions. 

Specific goals include further development in assessment and psychotherapy skills with a wide range of client populations through involvement in diversified inpatient and outpatient training activities.  Interns are expected to develop leadership and consultative skills within an academic medical center setting, and learn to function effectively in inter-professional relationships.  Interns are offered the opportunity for professional development through attendance at lectures, seminars and workshops, and optional opportunities for involvement in clinical research projects during the training year.  Clinical settings are largely based in healthcare environments and provide an opportunity to integrate ethical, cultural, and administrative considerations.

A psychology intern can expect to complete the internship with solid clinical training and a realistic sense of competence commensurate with this level of training.  Within this context, opportunities for individualized training experiences are realized through the choice of major rotations (i.e., training experiences of 6 months duration or longer),  participation in minor rotations (i.e., 1-day/week training experiences of a duration congruent with the training goals of the minor), and opportunities to provide outpatient treatment to inpatient populations of the psychology intern’s interest (1/2 day training experiences throughout the duration of the internship).

The EVMS Clinical Psychology Internship Program is part of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Eastern Virginia Medical School. The internship program was founded in 1976 as one of the graduate training programs of Eastern Virginia Medical School.  It has maintained continuous accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation (CoA) of the American Psychological Association since 1983.  The APA Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation Education Directorate is located at 750 First Street, NE, Washington, DC  20002-4242 (T:  202-336-5979). 

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Introduction

The Clinical Psychology Internship Program is part of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Eastern Virginia Medical School. The internship in psychology was founded in 1976 as one of the graduate training programs of the Eastern Virginia Medical School. It has maintained continuous accreditation by the American Psychological Association since 1983, and provides training for four interns each academic year.

General Description

The Internship subscribes to a practitioner-scholar model of training which encourages the growth of individual strengths, provides a variety of teaching styles and professional models, and emphasizes the development of the scientist-practitioner. Specific training goals include further development of assessment and psychotherapy skills with a wide range of client populations through involvement in diversified inpatient and outpatient activities.

Interns are also expected to develop leadership and consultative skills within healthcare settings,    and function as part of interprofessional  teams. Professional development through lectures, seminars, and workshops, and opportunities for clinical research are provided during training. Clinical settings also provide for an opportunity to integrate ethical and administrative issues into an appreciation for treatment issues.

The intern can expect to complete the year with solid general clinical training and a realistic sense of competence commensurate with this stage of training. The major rotation sequence focuses on the development of clinical skills. The intern may explore specialty areas through the choice of elective minor rotations and in outpatient work.


Curriculum

The intern completes two major rotations, each lasting six months.  The intern spends approximately 24-32 hours per week in the major rotation. The major rotations provide opportunities for conducting personality, intellectual and neuropsychological assessments; participating on interprofessional teams; and providing group, family and/or individual psychotherapy.

Minor rotations are training experiences that are eight hours per week in an area of interest to the trainees and by opting for a minor rotation interns can have more breadth in their training year (e.g. recent minor rotations have included inpatient integrated primary care psychology, outpatient integrated primary care psychology, child and adolescent neuropsychology, adult neuropsychology, pediatric rehabilitation medicine, eating disorders, bariatrics, sleep disorders, geriatric integrated primary care psychology, and clinical research projects). 

All interns also carry a limited outpatient caseload (generally 2-3 cases at any given time). Efforts are made to assign supervisors based on the intern's interests with respect to therapeutic modality and patient population.

Didactics and case conferences are offered throughout the year in areas such as behavioral medicine, primary care psychology, multicultural diversity, child and adolescent assessment and psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy, sleep disorders, neuropsychology, ethics, professional development and advanced personality assessment.

 

Application Information

Application and interview information and procedures are available here.

For more information, contact:

Director, Clinical Psychology Internship
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
P.O. Box 1980
Norfolk, VA 23501

757-446-5881
757-446-5918 (Fax)
chadwis@evms.edu This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it